Gfast map

gfast map copy

 

Dark Blue: Firm commitments from incumbent: BT (10M), Belgacom, Australian NBN, Swisscom,  Austria, Bezeq Israel, Chunghwa Taiwan, Telus Canada, Telekom South Africa, SK Korea, (U.S.) AT&T, Century, Frontier, Windstream, Belgium, Omantel

Mid Blue: Smaller carriers in Germany, Norway, Finland, Japan

Light Blue: Incumbent likely:  France, Germany, Italy

netcomm four portAustralia is connecting 1M homes to G.fast, some with a Netcomm distribution point mini-DSLAM. It's a small unit designed for pole or pit mounting. It's waterproof, pressure proof, and temperature resistant. Their matching home modem is bittorrent friendly, with two USB ports for a hard drive dedicated to sharing.

A reverse power unit at the customer, the NDD-0100-01, can save the cost of bringing power to the DSLAM. They don't expect many orders until the second half of 2018, as nbn is waiting for the second generation chips. Those exist, but probably won't be ready for regular use until late next year. 

Netcomm demonstrated RP with BT Openreach in August.

BT doesn't have the budget to buy many. BT's green-eyeshade folks canceled the fiber to the distribution point plans and instead are reusing the existing cabinets. Speeds will only be 160 megabits to 330 meg, which should be called G.halffast.

Netcomm's better known for fixed wireless gear, including a wireless home gateway they are selling to AT&T. Presumably, they are trying to persuade T to use the distribution point unit as well. For now, AT&T is only doing G.fast from the basement in larger buildings. using an Adtran or Nokia unit.

Netcomm has been making modems since 1982 and is listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. 142 of their 214 employees are engineers, including at a branch in the U.S. to service AT&T. 

They took a loss of $4M in the year to June 2017 on $106M in sales. Now that they have ramped up for the large contracts, they expect to be profitable.

 I have no information on whether the DSLAM is proof against the vicious wombat bite.