Gfast map

gfast map copy

 

In 2016, G.fast looked very promising.
Thousands worked at developing and deploying.
It wasn't enough. 
Most carriers are investing
in fiber or 5G instead.

 

Dark Blue: Firm commitments from incumbent: BT (10M), Belgacom, Australian NBN, Swisscom,  Austria, Bezeq Israel, Chunghwa Taiwan, Telus Canada, Telekom South Africa, SK Korea, (U.S.) AT&T, Century, Frontier, Windstream, Belgium, Omantel

Mid Blue: Smaller carriers in Germany, Norway, Finland, Japan

Light Blue: Incumbent likely:  France, Germany, Italy

Bugatti Veyron by Huntster'10 Gbps, yikes!" writes a senior engineer after reading my story about 10 gig homes in Hong Kong. "Do the customers with 10 Gbps access also own a 1001 Horsepower Bugatti Veryon car?  I wish someone would do a blind scientific study of the highest access bit-rate for which 99.5% of customers could not perceive any improvement in service.  Of course, speed-test would have to be disabled.  At some point, the speed will be limited by other factors: application software, LAN, performance of the customer device, server capacity, or the customer’s visual cortex.  Seriously, how fast can you drink from a fire-hose? 

Another fascinating statistic would be the highest data rate actually consumed by customers who have an access service with 200 Mb/s or more.  This does not mean that marketing higher bit rates is wrong; after all there is a proven market for cars with more than 400 Horsepower." Talking to a reporter could be "career limiting" at the gentleman's company.

What presumably happened in Hong Kong is the vendor (?Huawei) offered PCCW a great deal on 10 gig equipment in order to create a model deployment. Now that the chips for 10 gig are shipping, 10 gig doesn't have to be that much more expensive than 1 gig.

1 gig is becoming the usual speed on new networks because today there is little difference in cost between 1 gig and 100 megabits. There'd be a natural $20-60 premium for 10 gig gear but prices are negotiable.

In Korea for the ITU Plenipot, I asked a dozen officials what Koreans are doing with the gigabit service they are getting? Most avoided the question. A few said, "I don't know." The best answer was, "They buy the gigabit for prestige."

At the same event, a Korean telco had a display of their 10 gigabit system, soon come.