G.fast,

  • 500 megabit G.fast to 15M Brits

    G.Fast performance per AlcatelG.Fast speeds. Larger version below  Update 7/13 I've since learned the BT target speed is 250 megabits because they don't intend to deploy enough fiber for higher speeds. From January: If a 4,000 home summer trial goes well, 3/4ths of the country will covered over a decade.  Gavin Patterson's plan goes far beyond anything even rumored in any other country. Trevor Linney and BT were among the first testing G.fast. At that time they were part of the gigabit hype. Patterson's announcement this time is far more realistic, speaking of "hundreds of megabits" for now. In fact, BT's talk of 400 metres suggests they are looking at one of the Midi-DSL versions rather than today's G.fast.

    • "speeds of a few hundred megabits per second to millions of homes and businesses by 2020. Speeds will then increase to around 500 Mbps as further industry standards are secured and new kit is developed." 

    A few hundred megabits is closer to the current state of the art, especially if you measure download speeds. It's realistic to expect improvements to G.fast over time.  The current designs only use 106 MHz but the standard allows up to 212 MHz. Alcatel and other engineers are confident that non-linear precoding will be a major improvement but non-linear wasn't ready for the current version of the standard. I believe the noise-cancellation (vectoring) in the earlier chips will have room for improvement.

    Huawei supplied the gear for the earlier BT testing, Their HiSilicon subsidiary is working on a G.fast chip but I don't know if it's ready. If HiSilicon isn't available, both Sckipio and Broadcom are promising chips for trials in the summer. 

  • AT&T chooses 400-700 meg G.fast for ~5M FTTP homes

    Not a gigabit but pretty darn good. AT&T, assured the DirecTV merger is going through, is about to go public with the long-planned upgrade of ~5M U-Verse homes to hundreds of megabits. They will take four years and reach about 15% of their homes. Gigabit gear won't be available for several years.

    Randall Stephenson in 2004 told Wall Street AT&T was using fiber, not copper, for all “new builds,” although I believe it took a few more years. “New builds” are 1-2% of the network each year. That suggests four million to eight million homes are ready with FTTB.

    With most of the construction already done, the upgrade will easily fit in AT&T reduced capital budget. I estimate G.fast will cost $75-250 per home passed. The cost over four years is is only a few % of annual capex and will be recovered in months from customer charges. It would be stupid not to upgrade and AT&T's top management isn't stupid.  

    The 400-700 megabit down speed of today's G.fast is confirmed by the early field trials. I previously reported that Swisscom, "Gets between 285 and 402 Mbps downstream and between 85 and 109 Mbps upstream. Results depend on copper cable length: on short copper cables (ca 24 meters) we were even able to reach 624 Mbps Downstream / 151 Mbps Upstream in field but without connected customers." Telekom Austria measured 536 megabits down and 116 up.

    The chart below, from Alcatel, shows combined upstream and downstream speeds in early testing. Combined, the speeds up to 150 meters are 500-800 megabits. Subtracting 100 megabits for the upstream yields 400-700 megabits downstream, what I had estimated from a different data set.

  • Briefs

    The National Telecommunications Agency of Brazil (Anatel) imposed a fine of 8.7 million reais ($ 2.1 million) to Sky (AT & T) by accumulating an excessive number of complaints and delaying the installation of the service in its coverage area .

    The sanction determined by the Superintendent of Control Obligations regulator is provided in the General Plan of Quality Goals Pay TV service and can be appealed to the Board of the agency, Tela Viva reported.

    If no appeal the penalty, the fine was reduced by 25 percent and lowered the amount to 6.5 billion reais ($ 1.5 million). To access this benefit, the operator must resign in writing to the appeal.

    In November 2015, Sky marched second in the market, with a share of 28.2 percent, equivalent to 5.4 million users. America Movil then led with a share of 52.1 percent of clients--10,000,000.

    - See more at: http://www.telesemana.com/blog/2016/01/20/anatel-multa-con-us-21-millones-a-sky-brasil-por-incumplir-metas-de-calidad/#sthash.9Gqs4J4n.dpuf

     

     

    China's CIG offers OEM design with Sckipio. pr

     

     

     

     

     

    Cambridge Industries Group (CIG) Moves into G.fast

    Leading G.PON ODM/JDM Aims to Win in G.fast OEM Market

      

    Ramat Gan, Israel, October 15, 2015 – Cambridge Industries Group (CIG), the world’s leading independent ODM/JDM/OEM focused on broadband access, has announced it is entering the G.fast market with a new Sckipio-based G.fast CPE.

    “CIG is well known for its R&D skills which covers wired and wireless CPE especially for FTTx GPON,” said Gerry Wong, Chairman and CEO of CIG. “We aim to bring our scale, relationships, and expertise into the G.fast arena.”

    The new G.fast CPE solution, as shown next week in the Broadband World Forum 2015, is based upon the highly acclaimed Sckipio G.fast technology.

    “Many of the top tier OEMs purchase customer premises equipment from CIG,” said David Baum, co-founder and CEO of Sckipio Technologies. “By partnering with CIG, Sckipio ensures the leading OEMs get the best G.fast technology in the quickest and most economical way.”

     

    About CIG

    Cambridge Industries Group (CIG), headquartered in Shanghai, China, is a leading independent ODM/JDM/OEM of carrier and enterprise grade customer premise equipment.

    CIG focuses on the following areas:

    –EPON/GPON products based on FTTH/FTTB technology

    –Wi-Fi and Small Cell products based on wireless access technology

    –DSL technology such as VDSL, G.fast, FTTdp

    –IoT, Smart Home and Home NAS products

    –End-to-end ODM/ JDM (Joint development Manufacture) service

     

    Utilizing advanced R&D and product realization processes coupled with state-of-the-art volume manufacturing, millions of CIG‘s products are deployed worldwide through our partners. For more information visit: http://www.ci-g.com

     

    About Sckipio

     

    Sckipio is the leader in G.fast modems and is dedicated to delivering ultra-broadband using next-generation G.fast-based Fiber-to-the-distribution point (FTTdp) architectures. Sckipio offers a complete G.fast solution – chipsets bundled with software – for a variety of access and mobile backhaul applications based on the ITU G.fast G.9700 and G.9701 standards, to which Sckipio is a leading contributor. Founded by a veteran team of communications experts with deep experience in broadband access and home networking solutions, and backed by leading venture capitalists, Sckipio is well positioned to win the market for the next-generation of broadband access solutions. For more information about Sckipio, visit our website at www.sckipio.com.

    For more information, follow us on LinkedInSlideShare, and Twitter @SckipioTech.

     

    Media Contacts:

    Sckipio Contact:

    Karen Quatromoni

    Rainier Communications

    kquatromoni@rainierco.com

    508-475-0025 x150

     

    CIG Contact:

    Rose Hu

    Cambridge Industries Group

    rosehu@ci-g.com

    The National Telecommunications Agency of Brazil (Anatel) imposed a fine of 8.7 million reais ($ 2.1 million) to Sky (AT & T) by accumulating an excessive number of complaints and delaying the installation of the service in its coverage area .

    The sanction determined by the Superintendent of Control Obligations regulator is provided in the General Plan of Quality Goals Pay TV service and can be appealed to the Board of the agency, Tela Viva reported.

    If no appeal the penalty, the fine was reduced by 25 percent and lowered the amount to 6.5 billion reais ($ 1.5 million). To access this benefit, the operator must resign in writing to the appeal.

    In November 2015, Sky marched second in the market, with a share of 28.2 percent, equivalent to 5.4 million users. America Movil then led with a share of 52.1 percent of clients--10,000,000.

    - See more at: http://www.telesemana.com/blog/2016/01/20/anatel-multa-con-us-21-millones-a-sky-brasil-por-incumplir-metas-de-calidad/#sthash.9Gqs4J4n.dpuf
  • G.fast Paris Springtime (May 18-20, 2016) Should be the Event of the Year

    Paris-Concorde-by-Dennis-JarvisAn exceptional event returns. In 2015, BT. AT&T. Swisscom. Broadcom. Sckipio. Ikanos. Alcatel. Huawei. ASSIA. All sent a senior tech guy, often the CTO. It went beyond a great education. The future of G.fast was defined in a way you only expect in ITU standards. 

    Attendance was good but not too many for lively debate. I chaired and ensured very point of view was expressed. We focused on key questions including how to get to the gigabit speeds promised. Trevor Linney of BT made the case for long reach from cabinets rather than distribution points. The people who wrote the standard explained just what it meant.

  • More Bits, More Power, More People Connected for BT

    British-Telecom-noise-dataBT thinks the current G.fast is too conservative and the standard needs to be changed for more performance. Gavin Patterson is telling the government BT is going to deliver a gigabit. He's arguing BT shouldn't be broken up because BT is building "the best network in Europe." But his best network is running at 330 megabits while cable around the world is going to a gigabit. Comcast is about to offer a gigabit to 40 million homes. 

    The order came down from the top: make it faster. The same thing is happening at AT&T. They've promised 12M lines of "GigaPower," much of which will be G.fast. But it's not a gigabit. So AT&T is leading the move for a new standard with more speed.

    BT Openreach's latest update lists key developments they expect will increase speeds:

  • Reverse power working at Aethra

    aetheaAethra_videoDemo'd live at BBWF. Great Britain has 4,000,000 "distribution points," simple copper boxes generally without power. Bringing electricity to each box could double the cost of G.fast deployment, which is targeted at $100-250 home. Add monthly charges as well..

      To many telcos, the biggest advantage of G.fast is "parasitic power." The G.fast gear gets power from the customer gateway, not from the telco system. Instead of running a powerline to each box - often very expensive - the G.fast DSLAM draws power from each user's modem. That allows telcos to pop mini-DSLAMs on poles, in small underground spaces.... 

       The standards committee was confident parasitic power would work well. 

  • Schneider of Adtran: We bonded G.fast for over a gigabit

    Fleming007impressionGigabit required to keep up with cable. It's in the standard, but until recently everyone assumed it would be delayed for lack of customer demand. But with gigabit cable coming close, AT&T is pressing for a gigabit over DSL. Adtran, a major supplier to AT&T and Deutsche Telekom, has proven that G.fast can easily exceed a gigabit downstream by bonding two lines. It's just a lab demonstration for now without a timetable for field trials. 

    G.fast vectoring and pre-coding require serious processing power to keep up with the high speeds. Bonding for even higher speeds is a challenge, but Adtran CTO Kevin Schneider doesn't see any obstacles that will prevent practical deployment. 

  • Taiwan, Alcatel: G.fast is Commercial

    chunghwaBT calls 4,000 a trial but Alcatel calls similar at Chunghwa "first commercial deployment." Whatever you call it, G.fast is here, with about 10,000 lines about to be installed. Rami Verbin of Sckipio told me the real growth won't come until 2016 and it looks like he was on track. A couple of years ago, Chunghwa promised to spend $3B to bring "fiber" to 97% of premises by 2015. but Tony Brown reports only 200,000 true fiber to the home lines by the middle of this year. 

    The embarrassing delay gives them incentive to make stronger claims than BT. Taiwan is probably not connecting significantly more lines this year than England. Everyone knows this is early equipment likely to need debugging. The average Taiwanese will get higher speeds than the average Brit because there are far more apartments dwellers in Taiwan. The English love their gardens. From the basement, speeds will often be 400-700 megabits down. 

    Britain originally planned to bring 400-700 megabits to most homes but decided not to spend the money on the million+ field units that would require. Instead, they will run G.halffast, the same gear but over longer runs from the (much fewer) existing cabinets. The official word is that they will reach 300-500 megabits combined upstream and downstream. I'll call it 250 meg down until proven otherwise.