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Dark Green: Firm commitments from incumbent: BT (10M), Belgacom, Australian NBN, Swisscom,  Austria, Bezeq Israel, Chunghwa Taiwan, Telus Canada, Telekom South Africa, SK Korea, (U.S.) AT&T, Century, Frontier, Windstream, Belgium, Omantel

Mid Pink: Smaller carriers in Germany, Norway, Finland, Japan

Light Green: Incumbent likely:  France, Germany, Italy

WTTR New YorkT plans much bigger splash in territory starting soon as well. Large buildings and groups are being fought over hard by AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, and others. Verizon brought Fios fiber to this market almost a decade ago, as did local independents. Comcast is offering gigabit coax, which it is soon offering to all ~40M homes as well. 

AT&T jumped in more recently, led by Ed Balcerzak of their DirecTV division. DirecTV has millions of lines of coax bringing TV from rooftop antennas, a natural opportunity for broadband. Reporters see the new announcement as the kickoff of a major move with G.fast. 

In selected neighborhoods of ~65% of the U.S., AT&T will consider running fiber to the basement or WTTR - Wireless to the Rooftop - plus G.fast at 500 megabits.

The program has been under way for a while and has connected a very limited number of buildings in Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, New York City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Seattle and Tampa. They promoted the offering in Light Reading last year. Since the network must grow building by building, initial volume is unlikely to be large.

In ~35% of the U.S., their primary territory, they still need to finish integrating the G.fast into their software systems. They hope to be ready around year-end and move aggressively in home districts, one reason Tom Stanton of Adtran is optimistic for 2018.

At 3M homes passed/year, AT&T is well along on one of the world's largest fiber home builds. Randall announced it two years ago, touting the now much lower costs of FTTH today. They are telling the street the take rate is strong and will soon be profitable. That's fortunate because customers are fleeing AT&T DSL for cable. Despite now reaching 5M homes with fiber, they lost 7,000 broadband customers last quarter. 

The planned 12M fiber homes are less than a third of their territory. G.fast, they believe, can be deployed more quickly. It saves money in many locations. BT is passing 1M homes this year with G.fast, going to 3M/year. AT&T can ramp as quickly if the business case works.

AT&T intends to end copper to at least ten million homes because wireless only is more profitable in many locations. They intend to protect another 25M+ homes, upgrading as practical. G.fast could cover 10M of them at 500 megabits in a few years.

Adtran and Calix are getting a strong takeup of their Software Defined Networking, including most G.fast and NG-PON2 in the field. AT&T is moving faster than anyone else in the world to SDN, so I'm sure the new deployments will use SDN.  

Alan Tamboli of Dell'oro sees even more growth in 2019, especially if Deutsche Telekom moves forward on their plan for G.fast in larger buildings.

Illustration of WTTR from Siklu, who sells a 5 gigabit microwave for backhaul. 

AT&T's G.fast on Sale Now to Apartment and Condominium Properties in 22 Metros Across the U.S.

G.fast Being Deployed in 8 Metros With 14 Additional Metros Selling the Service to Apartments, Condos

AT&T Provides Connectivity Solution to Properties Without Access to Fiber

 

DALLAS, Aug. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- AT&T* is offering another option for ultra-fast internet for apartment and condominiums ("MDUs") in 22 major metro areas.

We recently completed a trial of G.fast in Minneapolis, the first of the 8 initial launch cities to have a live G.fast property.

 

G.fast can be deployed immediately in MDUs in parts of the following metros:

  • Boston
  • Denver
  • Minneapolis
  • New York City
  • Philadelphia
  • Phoenix
  • Seattle
  • Tampa

Additionally, G.fast is currently on sale to MDUs in parts of 14 other metros with deployment planned in the near future. These include:

  • Albany, N.Y.
  • Baltimore
  • Buffalo, N.Y.
  • Cincinnati
  • Colorado Springs, Colo.
  • Hartford, Conn.
  • Omaha, Neb.
  • Pittsburgh
  • Portland, Ore.
  • Providence, R.I.
  • Richmond, Va.
  • Rochester, N.Y.
  • Washington, D.C.
  • Salt Lake City

Each of these metros is located outside of our traditional 21-state home internet service-area. G.fast provides internet access to apartment and condo units over existing coaxial cables. This can minimize disruption for current residents because there's no need to place new wiring in each residence. AT&T will offer internet speeds of up to 500 megabits per second1, but G.fast provides the capability to allow AT&T to offer greater speeds over time. Residents of these properties can also enjoy the availability of DIRECTV without installing a dish at their individual units.

G.fast adds another innovative solution to existing fiber and millimeter-wave wireless access solutions for MDU property owners to provide their residents high speed internet and TV services. 

"We're tapping into the existing internet infrastructure in some multifamily properties to bring ultra-fast internet in less time and with less disruption than replacing the network with fiber," said Ed Balcerzak, senior vice president, AT&T Connected Communities. "While fiber to the unit remains the best broadband solution for most properties where possible, G.fast and fixed millimeter-wave provide connectivity to properties that aren't able to support fiber. AT&T is committed to providing apartments and condos with connectivity across the nation, and innovations such as G.fast are helping us to do that."

1 Actual speeds will vary.  See att.net/speedtiers and att.com/speed101 for more information

 

AT&T Trialing Fixed-Wireless Millimeter Wave to Deliver High-Speed Internet Outside of its Traditional Wireline Service Area

Apartment Residents in Minneapolis First to Enjoy AT&T Internet Outside of Wireline Service Area

Apartment and Multifamily Properties in Additional Metro Areas Under Consideration for Service

AT&T1 is trialing a point-to-point millimeter wave wireless technology that uses in-building wiring to deliver a 100 megabits per second connection accessible to each apartment unit.2 This first-of-its-kind trial for AT&T uses a combination of wired and wireless network technologies to provide these speeds to multiple apartment complexes in Minneapolis, outside of our traditional 21 state wireline service area.

We plan to make faster speeds available, likely a speed tier of 500Mbps, in these trial properties through this fixed-wireless solution.

 “We’re trialing the latest innovations in wireless and wired network technologies. This will make it possible for us to potentially deliver an internet connection to more locations where we have not previously been able to offer a home internet connection,” said Ed Balcerzak, senior vice president, Commercial and Connected Communities, AT&T. “If successful, this will give us the ability to offer a combination of internet, DIRECTV and wireless services to apartment complexes and multifamily communities in additional metro areas.”

Residents in these trial properties can also enjoy our DIRECTV service. Our DIRECTV Advantage solution uses a single satellite dish on the building to send a video signal to a centralized distribution system for the property. This makes it possible to offer DIRECTV service in every unit without satellite dishes on balconies.

What is the fixed-wireless technology solution?

We’re using millimeter wave wireless technology to send a multi-gigabit signal from a central building connected to fiber to neighboring locations, and then connecting each unit over in-building wiring. This makes it possible for us to offer ultra-fast internet speeds to residents in the entire property at a fraction of the time and cost typically associated with making service available.

  • Wireless: We’re extending ultra-fast internet speeds from a fiber-connected property to neighboring properties using small radio/antenna systems placed on the properties’ rooftops. Millimeter wave offers a high-capacity wireless signal that makes it possible to connect a neighboring residential property’s infrastructure to speeds of several gigabits per second.  
  • Wired: Once a neighboring building receives the multi-gigabit millimeter wave wireless signal, we convert it to an ultra-fast wired internet connection. We then use existing or new wiring in the property to offer internet access directly to each unit.  

After customers in these properties sign up for service, they can plug their Wi-Fi router into an existing wall outlet to get internet service in their apartment.

What does this mean for residents outside of these trial properties?

Fixed-wireless millimeter wave technology gives us the ability to make ultra-fast internet speeds available to additional locations in less time and with less disruption. This is particularly true in apartment and multifamily communities.

We’re evaluating the expansion of this fixed-wireless millimeter wave solution to connect additional properties outside of our traditional wireline service area. Additional areas under consideration where we might connect more properties include, but are not limited to, Boston, Denver, New Jersey, New York City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Seattle and Washington D.C.

 

 

The Site for gfast 230
 

G.fast News

I’m still working through remarkable presentations from the Broadband Forum events. Michael Weissman, Bernd Hesse and team did a remarkable job choosing the speakers. http://bit.ly/BBFBASE

Deutsche Telecom: 35b Supervectoring Delayed to 2019 http://bit.ly/35blater
Broadcom is now over 3 years late. DT briefed German reporters after their financial call and revealed 35b was now delayed until 2019. 35b should deliver 200+ meg downloads 500-600 meters, a crucial tool for DT, which is losing share to cable. Cable now covers about 70% of Germany and is expanding. DT now only offers 50-100 megabit DSL while cable is often 400 megabits, going to a gigabit. 

The problem is software; the hardware is shipping and supposedly will work. DT says 35b is not ready to turn on. Broadcom in 2015 said 35b was in "production" in the press release below. Alcatel in early 2016 said to expect complete systems very soon. "35g is very similar to 17a so there should be little delay."

Broadcom's problems are leading major telcos and vendors to have a plan B, using Sckipio G.fast. DT itself is planning extensive G.fast deployments in 2019, mostly in apartment buildings. http://bit.ly/35blater

Gigabit 100 Meters - Unless the Wires are Lousy http://bit.ly/gflousy
Speeds are fine, "Unless there's a line problem." I've been reporting for three years that ~10% of lines have problems. In the chart by Rami Verbin of Sckipio, he finds G.fast goes ~130 meters on good lines. Poor lines have about half the reach. 

His chart roughly matches the reports from Swisscom, Belgacom, and England for both G.fast & vectored DSL. The 10% with problems can cause the majority of the line-related complaints to support. The angry customers drive up cost.

Rami's solution to reach the gigabit is bonding, supported on the Sckipio chips. Verbin made some additional points:

  • 4 gigabits is possible by bonding two decent 2 gigabit lines.
  • Even in a service from remote cabinets, ~25% are close enough to get a full gigabit."
  • cDTA and iDTA are practical ways to deliver much higher upstream by switching some bandwidth from downstream to upstream only when needed.
  • 35B will probably be similar but Deutsche Telecom doesn't expect to deploy until 2019. http://bit.ly/gflousy

AT&T Wants Coax 2-5 Gigabit G.fast. Very Soon. http://bit.ly/ATTCoax
AT&T faces intense competition from cable, talking about 10 gigabits in both directions. (Cable will only be 1 gig down, ~100 meg up, until ~2021.) AT&T wants something to brag about as well.

AT&T gained millions of lines of coax as part of the DirecTV deal. Alcatel and Huawei are leading the development of G.mgfast. That uses 424 MHz, full duplex, to achieve ~2.5 gigabits in both directions. The reach on telco twisted pair is only about 30 meters. On coax, those speeds can probably extend far enough to service most apartment buildings. Using 848 MHz, speeds can reach 5 gigabits. The ITU standards group has been aiming for 2019-2020 for G.mgfast, too slow for AT&T's marketers. David Titus wants a high-speed standard for coax "early in 2018." He believes that is "doable."http://bit.ly/ATTCoax

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