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Gfast map July 2017

Dark blue: Firm commitments from incumbent: BT (10M), Belgacom, Australian NBN, Swisscom,  Austria, Bezeq Israel, Chunghwa Taiwan, Telus Canada, Telekom South Africa, SK Korea, (U.S.) AT&T, Century, Frontier, Windstream, Belgium, Omantel

Light blue: Smaller carriers in Germany, Norway, Finland, Japan

Green: Incumbent likely:  France, Germany, & Poland  

British-Telecom-noise-dataBT thinks the current G.fast is too conservative and the standard needs to be changed for more performance. Gavin Patterson is telling the government BT is going to deliver a gigabit. He's arguing BT shouldn't be broken up because BT is building "the best network in Europe." But his best network is running at 330 megabits while cable around the world is going to a gigabit. Comcast is about to offer a gigabit to 40 million homes. 

The order came down from the top: make it faster. The same thing is happening at AT&T. They've promised 12M lines of "GigaPower," much of which will be G.fast. But it's not a gigabit. So AT&T is leading the move for a new standard with more speed.

BT Openreach's latest update lists key developments they expect will increase speeds:

  • Increasing the maximum aggregate transmit power from 4dBm to 8dBm
  • Increasing the number of bits per tone from 11 to 15 
  • Improved use of the frequency band below 30MHz
  • Optimised frequency usage with VDSL2 
They, like many others, want to raise the limit of vectored connections from today's 16 homes to 48 or higher.
 

Ikanos's Arun Hiremath is optimistic they can deliver what BT is asking. For short loops, Ikanos is designing to 1.2 gigabit speed. These design changes should also help longer loops. Arun sees better analog engineering as crucial.

BT's decision earlier this year mostly to use existing cabinets changed the focus of the industry. Most important now  is long loop performance rather than high frequencies that don't reach very far. Non-linear precoding is necessary in the higher frequencies but not as vital at lower frequencies with reach. With no carrier interested in going to 212 MHz, coding improvements are on the back burner. 

 

BT Openreach's latest update lists key developments they expect will increase speeds:

  • Increasing the maximum aggregate transmit power from 4dBm to 8dBm
  • Increasing the number of bits per tone from 11 to 15 
  • Improved use of the frequency band below 30MHz
  • Optimised frequency usage with VDSL2 
They, like many others, want to raise the limit of vectored connections from today's 16 homes to 48 or higher


212 GHz and cDTA are soon shipping from Adtran. True gigabit is here. Sales takeoff is almost in sight, probably Q1 2018.
Australia confirms 1M, AT&T is ready to ramp, DT finally is moving. Omantel and Telkom South Africa are now on the map. Almost all telcos are now choosing G.fast for large buildings when they don't go FTTH. MNet Cologne and Chunghwa Taiwan have changed from fiber all the way to G.fast in the basement.

212 MHz and cDTA Are Ready: Adtran http://bit.ly/GF212cDTA
Frank Miller of Century: G.fast Will be Important to Us http://bit.ly/GFCentury

Carl Russo: Since 2007, I've Been Turning Calix Into a Software Company http://bit.ly/CalixSDN

Adtran Chosen for Australia nbn Fiber to the curb. http://bit.ly/GFnabAus

nbn looking to a million lines. This one is big. Adtran is on a roll, with DT & AT&T also looking good for 2018.

1,400,000,000 In The Works. 1.4 Gigabits http://bit.ly/GF14Gig
South Africa & Connecticut Go Nokia http://bit.ly/SouthAF

Omantel: 90% Fiber & G.fast http://bit.ly/Omantel

 

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