august
Dark blue: 
Firm commitments from incumbent: BT (10M), Belgacom, Swisscom,                                          Ad from Sckipio
Austria, Bezeq Israel, Chunghwa Taiwan, Korea SK, (U.S.) Century & Windstream
Light blue: Smaller carriers: Canada, Germany, Norway, Finland, Japan
Green: Incumbent likely: France, Germany, Australia, Poland & Panama                                    
Below: Country by country details. 

Read more ...

Alcatel midi coding 330x152230 megabits (up and down combined) looks to win at Deutsche Telekom. Call it what you like - Alcatel, Huawei, Adtran all have their own names. 35b - referring to the 35 MHz used - is emerging as most popular.

35b uses more MHz to get higher speeds out of DSL. To keep the comparison meaningful, I subtract the upstream and hence call this 150 megabits. The speed is from a KPN lab test (below, KPN pr in Google translation.) Paul Spruyt of Alcatel believes speeds still have room to improve within the 35 MHz band. Adtran tells me production units suitable for volume deployment are unlikely before summer of 2016. 

The 400-700 megabit speeds of G.fast come from using even more spectrum, 106 MHz. Both G.fast and highest speed VDSL (30a) use different tones from the 17 MHz VDSL used by Deutsche Telekom. 35b and 17 MHz VDSL can be vectored together; G.fast and 17 MHz VDSL probably not. 35b uses the same 4.3125 KHz tones as the 12M lines of DT's existing 17 MHz VDSL. (See illustration from Alcatel.)

DT doesn't want to upgrade those lines but does want to vector them. CTO Bruno Jacobfeuerborn told reporters he would widely use G.fast beginning in 2015 but it now looks like G.fast in Germany will be limited. DT wants to keep costs down by continuing to use the 17 MHz gear for another decade.  

Kabel Deutschland will be able to offer "twice the speed at the same price."  

PR from KPN and Alcatel of the first tests. 

 

Record copper in test environment with new technology

KPN during a successful pilot, along with Alcatel Lucent, with a new technology, a record speed on copper extracted from more than 230Mbit / s.

The pilot with the new technique, called Vplus, took place in a test center of KPN in The Hague. KPN has in recent years much progress has been made with high quality internet services. We invest in our networks and provide Internet that meets user demands speed, stability and security.

Fiberglass roll and upgrading copper

Meanwhile, two million households have access to fiber. We continue, where needed, fiberglass roll and we also currently upgrading the copper network with techniques such as pair bonding, vectoring and bonded vectoring. With the rollout of high-speed copper KPN is ahead of other European countries where techniques such as vectoring and pair bonding are still in their infancy. Vplus is a whole new technology that the frequencies used in the copper cable of 17 MHz stretches to more than 30 MHz. The technique is a first practical step towards 'bonded Vplus', where the speed can be doubled again to 400 Mbit / s. "Bonded Vplus' is still in the future, but that will probably soon be feasible.  

From, Alcatel

Vplus gets more out of VDSL2 vectoring

Vplus delivers speeds exceeding 300Mbps on a single copper pair
  • Vplus offers unmatched throughput, density and cost on 200-500m copper loops
  • Vplus is a simple extension of existing standard VDSL2 vectoring technology

Vplus is a perfect match for operators who need to deliver the highest possible speeds in a cost-effective way on medium-length loops. Vplus is a new technology that

  • Delivers aggregate speeds of 200Mbps and more over traditional copper telephone lines at distances up to 400 meters, and 300Mbps on loops shorter than 200m
  • Extends the frequency range used by VDSL2 17a vectoring to 30MHz to achieve these higher speeds
  • Can be mixed with existing VDSL2 17a deployments to fill the gap between VDSL2 vectoring (100Mbps aggregate at 700m) and G.fast (500Mbps+ aggregate at 100m)
  • Offers higher speeds (up to double) compared to VDSL2 on loops shorter than 500m
  • Offers longer reach (higher bit rates beyond 200m) and higher density (100-200 subscribers) compared to G.fast
  • Lowers operator costs compared to G.fast
VPLUS FILLS THE GAP BETWEEN VDSL2 VECTORING AND G.FAST

Figure 1 illustrates the typical performances you can expect from VDSL2 vectoring, G.fast, and Vplus.

Aggregate bit rates (upstream + downstream) are used for a fair comparison between technologies. G.fast performance is based on the ITU-T G.9701 standard (approval of which is expected in December 2014), i.e., using up to 106MHz of spectrum, and excluding VDSL2 (17a) spectrum to illustrate a mixed technology deployment.

 

Figure 1. Vplus fills the gap between VDSL2 vectoring and G.fast

 

In terms of bit rate, Vplus fills the gap between VDSL2 vectoring and G.fast. At loop lengths between 200 and 400 meters, Vplus delivers 200+Mbps and outperforms both VDSL2 vectoring and G.fast.

At shorter distances (less than 200m) Vplus does not match G.fast’s speeds, but still delivers up to 300Mbps. So even on short loops, Vplus makes a strong case for operators who need to deliver up to 300Mbps.

On longer loops, Vplus falls back to VDSL2 17a vectoring performance.

frequency division vectoring

Record copper in test environment with new technology

KPN during a successful pilot, along with Alcatel Lucent, with a new technology, a record speed on copper extracted from more than 230Mbit / s.

The pilot with the new technique, called Vplus, took place in a test center of KPN in The Hague. KPN has in recent years much progress has been made with high quality internet services. We invest in our networks and provide Internet that meets user demands for speed, stability and security.

Fiberglass roll and upgrading copper

Meanwhile, two million households have access to fiber. We continue, where needed, fiberglass roll and we also currently upgrading the copper network with techniques such as pair bonding, vectoring and bonded vectoring. With the rollout of high-speed copper KPN is ahead of other European countries where techniques such as vectoring and pair bonding are still in their infancy. Vplus is a whole new technology that the frequencies used in the copper cable of 17 MHz stretches to more than 30 MHz. The technique is a first practical step towards 'bonded Vplus', where the speed can be doubled again to 400 Mbit / s. "Bonded Vplus' is still in the future, but that will probably soon be feasible. 

feuerborn

Vplus and 17 MHz VDSL can be vectored together; G.fast and 17 MHz VDSL probably not.

Newsletter

Often interesting

Upperside rectangle

Latest
BT: G.fast performance "pretty much spot on"
DSM Could Increase G.fast Speeds 25-50+ Megabit
DT: No 35b VDSL before 2018, modems not available
AT&T G.fast confirmed (unofficially.)
Andrew Ferguson: DSLAMs can be different
Energia Selling Nokia G.fast in Japan
Calix Clobbered by Services Cost
Switzerland: We're going G.fast; Forget fiber home except in new builds 
Nokia takes XG-FAST to 8 gig in the lab at nbn 
Huawei jumping in to G.faster 
Paris G.fast Summit 2017 9 to 11 May will be a great show
100,000 G.fast modems sold by Technicolor - running VDSL Australia: 
700,000 "FTTdp homes." Should use G.fast but may go VDSL. 
Tens of millions G.fast lines predicted 
"Study" predicts $200/line G.fast chip price in 2022 !? 

Read more ...